Investment risks

Our investment products can provide both individual and institutional investors with flexible investment vehicles, which can accommodate varying appetites for risk, asset exposure and capital protection.

It is important that you understand the risks attached to each of the investments. The key risk areas are summarised below, but please remember that these are general risks and those relevant to a particular product are set out in the product literature.

Meteor does not provide financial advice or guidance on tax issues and we recommend that you talk to a financial adviser if you are considering investing.

Any investment should only form part of your total investment portfolio. You should also maintain savings you can access immediately and without penalty to meet any emergency cash needs that may arise during the investment term.

Availability and Residence – due to local regulatory and legal requirements, not all products described on this website are available in all jurisdictions and some may be available on a limited basis only. 

Cancellation Risk – the risk that if you decide to cancel the investment after assets have been purchased you could lose some of your money if the market(s) or asset(s) to which your contract is linked have fallen since the purchase date.

Counterparty Risk   - the risk that a financial institution with whom we arrange the assets to provide investment returns does not, or cannot, pay the amounts due, which could cause you to lose some or all of your money and any investment returns that would have otherwise been payable.

Early Encashment Risk - the risk that if you decide to encash the investment before maturity you could get less back than you invested. Administration charges for early encashment will increase any losses.

Inflation Risk – the risk that inflation will reduce the real value of your investment over time.

Investment Risk – The risk that the market(s) or asset(s) to which your investment is linked fall in value, which could cause you to lose money.

NISA Transfer Risk – if you wish to transfer an existing NISA this must be done in cash, which means your existing NISA manager will sell your investments and you may be charged an exit or transfer fee. There is the potential for loss of income or growth if markets should rise while your transfer remains pending. 

Liquidity Risk – the risk that you may not be able to immediately access the value of your investment.

Pricing Risk – the risk that a financial institution with whom underlying investments have been arranged may not be able to quote regular prices making it difficult to value your investment and delaying any early encashment request you may make.

Product Risk – the risk that the product design could produce a return that is lower than a direct investment in the market(s) or asset(s) to which the product is linked or may produce no return at all. 

Tax Risk – The values of any tax reliefs will depend on your individual circumstances. You should note that the levels and bases of taxation could change in the future and these changes may be applied retrospectively.

It is important that you read any product literature carefully and in full so that you understand how the product works and can decide whether or not you are prepared to accept the risks and the possible consequences of investing in a particular contract, before proceeding with an investment.